Spiced Nuts with Black Pepper Oil

Since I’ve eliminated gluten and dairy products, I’ve been eating more nuts to sustain me. Most nuts (prepared properly) are filled with nutrients, omega-3 fatty acids and fiber.  This recipe is made with pecans (which contain over 19 vitamins and minerals) and peanuts (which are really considered legumes). I use Jungle peanuts from Wilderness Family Naturals which do not contain aflotoxin, a toxic fungus found on most peanut varieties.  You could substitute different nuts for the pecans and peanuts though these two varieties do blend well with the spices. 

Endurance Black Pepper essential oil adds a depth of flavor that the spices alone can’t match.  Black pepper oil supports healthy metabolism, is anti-fungal and historically was used to provide endurance. It’s even been researched as an anti-inflammatory agent for arthritis and joint pain.  So when you have a busy day ahead of you, munch on some of these spiced nuts to get you through the day instead of a chemical energy bar or drink. Besides the benefits of the black pepper oil and the nutrients in the nuts, these just taste good. I’ve served them at parties and keep some on hand for casual snacking. These are definitely on the packing list when we go on vacation.

Ingredients

2 C pecan halves

2 C jungle peanuts

1 egg white, lightly beaten

1/4 C butter, melted

1 T chili powder

1 tsp ground red pepper

1/2 tsp garlic powder

1 tsp hot sauce

3 drops Young Living black pepper essential oil

Optional:  Soak and dehydrate your nuts before preparing the full recipe

1.  Combine pecans and peanuts in a 9 x 13 inch pan.

2.  Combine egg whites, butter and spices in a small bowl, stirring well.

3.  Pour spice mixture over nuts, stir to coat completely

4.  Bake, uncovered at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until toasted

5.  Cool completely in pan .

6.  Store in an airtight container in the fridge for maximum freshness.

Enjoy!

 

Bang J, Oh da H, Choi H et al. (2009).  Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritis effects of piperine in human interleukin 1 beta-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes and in rat arthritis models.  Arthritis Res Ther. 11 (2): R49

 

 

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